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  • Strawberries And Flowers, 2011, 70 x 50cm                                                         Shop here for Print acrylic on wrapping paper 

  • The Weather Inside, 2016, 69.9 x 50cm                                                                     Shop here for Print  acrylic, sticks and leaves on wrapping paper 

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  • CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ESSAY BY LEIGH STEIN 

  • This Season's Potato Print 18, 2009   35.5 x 28 cms  acrylic on newsprint                       Shop here for Print 

  • This Season's Potato Print, 8  , 2009  35.5 x 28cm  Acrylic on newsprint.                             Shop here for Print


  • A Season of Flight (vi), 2016  76.2 x 55.9 cms                                                                     Shop here for Print  acrylic, sticks, leaf and collage on paper 

  •  A Season of Flight (xiv), 2016  76.2 x 55.9 cms                                                             Shop here for Print acrylic, sticks, leaves and collage on paper 

  • A Season of Flight (vii), 2016  76.2 x 55.9 cms                                                              Shop here for Print acrylic, sticks, leaves and bean on paper 

  • Another Difficult Season's Veg Print (i) 2015, 76.2 x 55.9 cms                                         Shop here for Print   acrylic, sticks and leaf on paper 

  • This Season's Potato Print 7, 2009   35.5 x 28 cms   acrylic on newsprint

  • A Season of Flight (xiv), 2016, 76.2 x 55.9 cms    acrylic, sticks, leaves and collage on paper 

  •  A Season of Flight (viii), 2016   76.2 x 55.9 cms                                                          Shop here for Print                               acrylic, sticks, leaf and collage on paper

  • A Season of Flight (iii), 2016   76.2 x 55.9 cms  acrylic, leaf and bean on paper

     

  • Last Season's Potato Print 5, 2009   23 x 30 cms    acrylic on newsprint                   Shop here for Print

  • Another Difficult Season's Veg Print (vii), 2015  76.2 x 55.9 cms acrylic, sticks, leaf and collage on paper 

  • Another Difficult Season's Veg Print (ix), 2015  76.2 x 55.9 cms  acrylic, sticks, leaf and collage on paper 

  • Leigh Stein is the author of the poetry collection Dispatch From The Futurethe novel The Fallback Plan and, most recently, the memoir Land Of Enchantment.  Leigh Stein also the co-founder of BinderCon, the conference for women and gender variant writers.  She lives and works in Connecticut, USA where she is currently working on another novel.  The Full Essay The Botanical Theatre of Georgie Hopton can be read by clicking the right hand cover image.                                                                            

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  • BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES

    British Artist Georgie Hopton graduated from St Martins School of Art, London in 1989 with a series of sculptures, even though she had enrolled on a painting course. She’s not stopped changing her mind ever since. With her "magpie’s attraction to material and a greedy accumulation of ‘stuff’" she adopts a continual flow of new mediums and, over the course of her career, has worked within film, photography, sculpture, collage and printmaking.  

    This Autumn sees her launch Georgie Hopton Produce,  the beginnings of a fabric, wallpaper, and rug collection. She sees it as a natural  extension of her work; having, for some years, harboured a wish to immerse herself and the viewer in a complete world of her making.  The vegetable prints created from the produce she grows in her upstate NY vegetable garden each summer, as seen in the BOTANICAL THEATRE Exhibition, were the direct inspiration for her textiles and wallpaper.

    Hopton has exhibited in Europe and the USA is currently showing at Collateral Drawing 5, Strange Cargo, Folkestone Biennial and Turkish Tulips, The Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, County Durham (both 'til Nov 5th)

    Her work is housed in several permanent collections including the Arts Council Collection and her public art commissions can be seen at The Home Office and Royal London Hospital.

    She was nominated for the Max Mara Prize in 2007.                                                                                                          

     

    Selected Works from this exhibition are available for sale here  

    Find out more about Georgie Hopton here



    She was nominated for the Max Mara prize in 2007.

     

  •  

    Flowers speak a language, and can convey a multitude of symbols, ranging from purity to eroticism. They can offer a shorthand for condolence, regret, friendship, or passion. Many of Hopton’s prints could be read as images of fidelity and friendship, as so often one figure, or flower, is extending an arm, a stem, a leaf to another. Even the most abstract arrangements of lines and organic shapes overlap in seeming embrace.

    In an interview, Hopton describes watching the first seedlings emerge out of the ground and how it struck her that they looked like tiny sculptures.  Feeling pride and satisfaction in what she’d accomplished, she was simultaneously conflicted, suffering a mini identity crisis. “I am not a gardener,” she thought to herself. “I am an artist. So what the hell am I doing, spending each and every day here, away from the studio?"

    In her evolution from artist to gardener to gardener-artist, Hopton started photographing her relationship with her produce.  Her series of photographs, called “Harvest,” is Kahloesque in its surreal matchmaking of plants and body parts. Hopton’s self-portrait visually link her body with her produce. The garden feeds her body, but it also feeds her work, becoming her organic atelier.  Now, using that produce to print, Hopton's self-portraits have evolved to evoke flowers’ relationships with each other, and ours if we care to notice their humanity.

    Georgie Hopton radically dismantles the “still life" by literally chopping her materials apart, and bringing them back to life in new bodies. The result is a visual choreography of shape and line and color—the gardener has taught her flowers to dance.

    Leigh Stein

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  • Scroll right to enter the exhibition >>>>>>>>>>

  • GEORGIE HOPTON

    BOTANICAL THEATRE

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    Accompanying essay by Leigh Stein

    (extracts by kind permission for this exhibition)

     


  • THE BOTANICAL THEATRE OF GEORGIE HOPTON

    Extracts from an essay by Leigh Stein (a link to the full version is available to read at the end of this exhibition)

     

    Georgie Hopton cuts apart the living things she tends. From her garden in upstate New York, the British artist selects the flowers and vegetables tough enough to withstand paint and pressure, and prints with them, an appealingly simple technique that yields playful and witty variations on a floral motif. At once abstract and subtly figurative, decorative and expressive, this series of work reincarnates the artist’s chopped organic materials into boldly colorful subjects that pose, gesture, embrace, wink, and tip their hats. Liberated from a life underground, the lowly potato can be reborn here as the head of a dancer on the verge of arabesque, the arm of one petal-headed figure reaching out to another, or a raised fist. The evidence of Hopton’s admiration of Commedia dell’Arte and ballet is in her compositions of figures paired, or in threes, in a botanical theatre. More often than not ungrounded, these floral players float or fly, captured with paint like an Imogen Cunningham photograph of dancers mid-leap, or an Alexander Calder mobile of kinetic pieces.

    Bouquets of gesture. Windows of petals. Portraits of an eccentric floral family. Georgie Hopton’s vegetable prints, rendered in thick acrylic paint, offer a bold and original take on botanical art, pushing the limits of what we still recognize as flora. Through her use of unmixed, as-it-comes paint color and striking compositional choices, Hopton deliberately resists realism, and her flowers appear as if, after centuries spent frozen in still lifes and flattened in Victorian albums, the time has finally come for their liberation.

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